Adam Fischer (photo: Szilvia Csibi)

Adam Fischer conducts Mozart and Haydn

Adam Fischer is a conductor with an exceptional feeling for Viennese Classicism – its tonal language, its interplay of balance and energy. That was already apparent at a concert devoted to Mozart and Haydn with the Berliner Philharmoniker in 2019. Now he repeats this combination of composers. From Mozart, we will hear the exuberant Symphony No. 33 and the Kyrie in D minor – an anticipation of the Requiem. In addition, Fischer presents Haydn’s theatrical choral scene The Tempest and his penultimate symphony, which delights listeners with its vitality and a surprising timpani roll at the opening.

Berliner Philharmoniker

Adam Fischer conductor

Rundfunkchor Berlin

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Symphony No. 33 in B flat major, K. 319

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Kyrie in D minor, K. 341

Rundfunkchor Berlin

Joseph Haydn

The Storm for choir and orchestra, Hob. XXIVa:8

Rundfunkchor Berlin

Joseph Haydn

Symphony No. 103 in E flat major “Drumroll”

Dates and Tickets

Thu, 21 Oct 2021, 20:00

Philharmonie

Serie G

Fri, 22 Oct 2021, 20:00

Philharmonie

Serie A

Biography

“Haydn’s music has accompanied me since I was four years old,” Adam Fischer says. At that time he attended a concert with his father at which the “Surprise” Symphony, with the timpani beat, was performed. He was looking forward to the timpani beat so much and was bitterly disappointed because it was not as loud as he expected. When he complained to the conductor about it afterwards, he advised the boy: “Become a conductor yourself, then you can decide how loud the beat should be.” Adam Fischer, who comes from a Hungarian family of conductors, took this advice to heart. He studied in his native city of Budapest and with Hans Swarowsky at the University of Music in Vienna. He made his international breakthrough in 1978 with his performance of Fidelio at the Bavarian Staatsoper. He was general music director in Freiburg, Kassel, Mannheim and at the Budapest Opera and was named honorary conductor of the Vienna Staatsoper. In 1987 – before the fall of the Iron Curtain – he founded the Austro-Hungarian Haydn Orchestra with musicians from both countries, setting new standards for Haydn interpretations. As the long-time chief conductor of the Danish Chamber Orchestra, he is also acclaimed for his interpretations of Mozart and Beethoven symphonies. The conductor is convinced that “a symphony must be played like an opera; this range of emotions should also be expressed in a symphony.”

Adam Fischer (photo: Szilvia Csibi)