Avi Avital (photo: Harald Hoffmann)

Chamber Music

Avi Avital and the Venice Baroque Orchestra

Avi Avital provides an almost forgotten plucked instrument with a terrific comeback: the mandolin, which enjoyed its initial heyday during the Baroque era. Antonio Vivaldi and Giovanni Paisiello wrote enchanting concertos for the mandolin, which Avi Avital plays with virtuosity. He is accompanied by the Venice Baroque Orchestra, which also presents other instrumental works by the Venetian composer.

Venice Baroque Orchestra

Avi Avital Mandoline

Antonio Vivaldi

Concerto for Strings and Continuo in C major, RV 114

Antonio Vivaldi

Sinfonia in D minor, RV 127

Antonio Vivaldi

Concerto for Lute, 2 Violins and Continuo in D major, RV 93

Avi Avital Mandoline

Benedetto Marcello

Sinfonia No. 3 in G major for Strings and Continuo

Antonio Vivaldi

Concerto for Violin, Strings and Continuo in A minor, RV 356

Francesco Geminiani

Concerto grosso for Strings and Continuo in D minor “La Follia” after Corellis' Violin Sonata, op. 5 No. 12

Antonio Vivaldi

Concerto for Mandolin, Strings and Continuo in C major, RV 425

Avi Avital Mandoline

Giovanni Paisiello

Concerto for Mandolin, Strings and Harpsichord in E flat major

Avi Avital Mandoline

Antonio Vivaldi

Summer from The Four Seasons

Dates and Tickets

Programme

Igor Stravinsky once gibed that Antonio Vivaldi “composed the same concerto” 500 times. This paved the way for a prejudice whereby the Venetian Baroque composer lacked in musical imaginativeness – a perfidious suspicion that did not take into account that the mere sum of Vivaldi’s contributions to the genre was a formidable achievement. In addition, Vivaldi, who was born in 1678, lived in a time when music was undergoing manifold aesthetic and compositional changes. Especially the genre of the solo concerto, which he particularly espoused, was at a fledgling stage. Unable to fall back on any genre traditions, Vivaldi, together with two older composer colleagues, rendered a great service – nothing less than “inventing” the instrumental concerto, as well as consolidating it formally and structurally for the first time.

The experimental character that is characteristic of Vivaldi’s music despite its formidable structural perfection can be uncovered when listening to this Venice Baroque Orchestra concert. The orchestra, which was launched in 1997 by Italian harpsichordist Andrea Marcon, has made a name for itself as one of the most stylistically competent advocates of the music of the Baroque period, offering lively interpretations on concert and opera stages around the world.

In collaboration with the Israeli mandolinist Avi Avital, who was born in 1978, the Venice Baroque Orchestra will present five instrumental concerti by Vivaldi – including one from the composer’s irrepressible Opus 8, the Four Seasons. Vivaldi’s singular significance in music history will become apparent when the work of a younger composer like Giovanni Paisiello, born in 1740 and who primarily achieved fame in the field of opera, is performed during this concert. The evening will be rounded off with instrumental pieces by Benedetto Marcello and Francesco Geminiani.

Vivaldi, who also appeared as the composer of ca. 50 staged works, not only paved the way for future generations in the solo concerto field. Vivaldi could not have surmised his influence on future musical developments during his lifetime, but he knew what he was doing. Even Stravinsky had to acknowledge that when he amended his disrespectful criticism of Vivaldi’s solo concerti, ungrudgingly conceding that every single one of them is “perfect”.

Avi Avital (photo: Harald Hoffmann)

Venice Baroque Orchestra (photo: Anna Carmignola)