(photo: Peter Adamik)

Karajan Academy

From familiar Bach to unknown Mendelssohn

This concert features a musical discovery: a violin concerto by Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy. Not, however, the famous E minor, but an early work which Mendelssohn composed when he was 13 years old and was never published in his lifetime. The soloist is Carolin Widmann, who also directs this performance of the work by the students of the Karajan Academy. In contrast, the other items of the programme are well known: two cantatas and the Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 by Johann Sebastian Bach.

Scholars of the Karajan Academy

Raphael Alpermann direction

Vocalconsort Berlin

Carolin Widmann violin and direction

Academy III

Johann Sebastian Bach

Cantata “Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland”, BWV 62

Raphael Alpermann direction, Vocalconsort Berlin

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy

Konzert für Violine und Orchester d-Moll

Carolin Widmann violin and direction

Johann Sebastian Bach

Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D major, BWV 1050

Raphael Alpermann direction

Johann Sebastian Bach

» Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben«, Kantate BWV 147

Raphael Alpermann direction, Vocalconsort Berlin

Dates and Tickets

sales information

Sun, 16 Dec 2018, 20:00

Chamber Music Hall | Introduction: 19:00

Serie KA

Promoter/Booking

Karajan-Akademie der Berliner Philharmoniker e.V.

Herbert-von-Karajan-Straße 1

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Programme

At the concerts of the Karajan Academy of the Berliner Philharmoniker, the objective is to get to know some highly talented young musicians. And of course that’s the case this time as well. In addition, however, another musical discovery can be made at this concert: a violin concerto by Felix Mendelssohn. Admittedly not the famous one in E minor, completed in 1844, generally thought of as the composer’s only contribution to the genre, but rather an early work: in 1822 Mendelssohn– at the time just 13 years old! – composed a concerto for violin and strings in D minor, which never, however, appeared in print during the composer’s lifetime. Compared to his later work in the same genre, this violin concerto is even more strongly rooted in the classical tradition, but nonetheless constitutes a wonderful example of the phenomenal compositional talent of Mendelssohn, who in his day was considered a musical prodigy.

The soloist in this work, which is played extremely rarely and which was first “resurrected” only in 1951 by no less a personage than Yehudi Menuhin, is the violinist Carolin Widmann, who is internationally acclaimed for her pioneering spirit. Her interpretation of the D minor concerto will be framed by works by a composer whom Mendelssohn revered like hardly anyone else: Johann Sebastian Bach, whose Fifth Brandenburg Concerto will be performed, as well as other works. The scholars of the Karajan Academy will be musically directed by Carolin Widmann (Mendelssohn) and Raphael Alpermann (Bach); as conductor and harpsichordist (Akademie für Alte Musik, Concerto Melante, Berliner Barock Solisten), he is well-versed in historically informed performance practice.

(photo: Peter Adamik)

Carolin Widmann (photo: Lennard Rühle)