(photo: Oliver Hilmes)

Philharmonic Discourse

Babylon Berlin

The Weimar Republic was a time of contradictions and contrasts, of hopes and missed opportunities, of optimism and fear. While the political class abandoned the republic at the beginning of the 1930s, toppling the country into a dictatorship, the extremes were once again played out in literature, art and music. But how “golden” were the “Golden Twenties”? This is the question discussed by bestselling author and art historian Florian Illies, the historian Manfred Görtemaker and the journalist Tilman Krause.

Florian Illies

Manfred Görtemaker

Tilman Krause

Scholars of the Karajan Academy

Scholars of the Orchestras Academy of the Berliner Philharmoniker perform the Dance Suite, op. 30 by Ernst Toch

Dates and Tickets

sales information

Tue, 19 Feb 2019, 20:00

Ausstellungsfoyer Kammermusiksaal / Einführungsbereich

Programme

At its premiere in autumn 2017, the German television series Babylon Berlin enjoyed sensational success. The production takes place in Berlin during the so-called “Golden Twenties”. The focus is on police inspector Gereon Rath, who is transferred from Cologne to Berlin to investigate a blackmail case. Drugs, murder and political extremism all play a role. “Babylon Berlin rattles out a conspiracy scenario like the best US series,” rejoiced the reviewer in Der Spiegel, “and yet it is fully in the tradition of a genuinely German cinema of anxiety”.

The Weimar Republic was a time of contradictions and contrasts, of hopes and missed opportunities, of optimism and fear. While the economic crisis and politics paralysed Germany at the beginning of the 1930s, toppling it into a dictatorship, the extremes were once again thrashed out in literature, art and music. But how “golden” were the “Golden Twenties”? What is reality, and what is stylisation? How was life in the Berlin of the Weimar Republic? Which artistic trends characterised the age?

The best-selling author and art historian Florian Illies, the historian Manfred Görtemaker and the journalist Tilman Krause discuss this and much more.

(photo: Oliver Hilmes)