Hagen Quartett (photo: Harald Hoffmann)

Chamber Music

The Hagen Quartet plays Haydn, Schubert and Schumann

The Hagen Quartet – widely acclaimed for its illuminating concert programmes – combines the third string quartet from Schumann’s opus. 41 with a work by Haydn from the year 1788, about which an English critic wrote at the time that it was “full of spirit and fire, as if a young, still unspent genius were writing”. The ensemble also plays a string quartet by the 17-year-old Franz Schubert, which audibly ties in with Haydn, but at the same time paves the way for Romanticism in the string quartet genre.

Hagen Quartett:

Lukas Hagen violin

Rainer Schmidt violin

Veronika Hagen viola

Clemens Hagen cello

Joseph Haydn

String Quartet in A major, Hob. III:60

Franz Schubert

String Quartet No. 8 in B flat major, D 112

Robert Schumann

String Quartet in A major, op. 41 No. 3

Dates and Tickets

sales information

Mon, 04 Feb 2019, 20:00

Chamber Music Hall | Introduction: 19:00

Serie T

Programme

On her 23rd birthday, Clara Schumann was presented with the manuscripts for three string quartets – gifts from her husband Robert which were performed by members of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra at Schumann’s home that same evening. Clara was “delighted to the smallest detail. Everything is new, but clearly and finely made, and always in a true quartet style”. Not long before, Schumann had noted a “serious stagnation” in the string quartet compositions of his contemporaries: too often, in his opinion, “more attention was paid to highlighting the brilliance of the first player than the artful interweaving of all four”. Schumann found his own entry to the string quartet in 1842 by studying Joseph Haydn’s contributions to the genre, in which he admired the “purity of the movement”, the “artful interweaving” and the “original character of the melodic line”.

The Hagen Quartet – widely acclaimed for its enlightening concert programmes – combines the third string quartet from Schumann’s opus. 41 with a work by Haydn from the year 1788, about which an English critic wrote at the time that it was “full of spirit and fire, as if a young, still unspent genius were writing”. In addition, at the centre of this concert programme is a string quartet written in 1814 by the then 17-year-old Franz Schubert, which also audibly ties in with the achievements of Haydn, but at the same time paves the way for Romanticism in the string quartet genre.

Hagen Quartett (photo: Harald Hoffmann)