(photo: Heribert Schindler)

Organ

Organ Matinee: Ken Cowan and Noah Bendix-Balgley

Although the organ and the violin do not have much in common at first glance, both instruments are able in a particular way to make music sound almost like singing. This is shown by the Canadian organist Ken Cowan and Noah Bendix-Balgley, 1st concertmaster of the Berliner Philharmoniker, in works by Sergei Rachmaninoff, Sigfrid Karg-Elert and Maurice Ravel. As a solo artist, Ken Cowan also presents compositions by Franz Liszt, Marcel Dupré and Camille Saint-Saëns.

Ken Cowan organ

Noah Bendix-Balgley violin

Organ and Violin

Franz Liszt

Rákóczi March (arranged for organ by George Baker after the piano version of Vladimir Horowitz)

Johann Sebastian Bach

Sonata in C minor, BWV 1017 (arranged for violin and organ by Ken Cowan)

Franz Liszt

Mephisto Waltz (arranged for organ by Ken Cowan)

Sergei Rachmaninov

Vocalise, op. 34 No. 14 (arranged for violin and organ by Ken Cowan)

Marcel Dupré

Prelude and Fugue in C major, op. 36 No. 3

Sigfrid Karg-Elert

Pastorale for Violin and Organ, op. 48b No. 2

Camille Saint-Saëns

Danse macabre, op. 40 (arranged for organ by Ken Cowan)

Maurice Ravel

Tzigane (arranged for violin and organ by Ken Cowan)

Dates and Tickets

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Sun, 28 Apr 2019, 11:00

Philharmonie | Introduction: 10:00

Programme

Here’s a name to take note of: Ken Cowan. Wherever the Canadian organist appears, he inspires his audience to thunderous applause. For the 44-year-old, technical difficulties simply do not seem to exist when he flies over the keys in Franz Liszt’s Mephisto waltz with breathtaking virtuosity. But Ken Cowan’s musicianship is not limited to keyboard acrobatics. He is a sensitive and serious artist who is also able to delight his audience with quiet works.

Ken Cowan learned his trade at two of the most prestigious music schools in the United States: the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia and the Yale Institute of Sacred Music in New Haven. For today’s organ matinee, he is joined by Noah Bendix-Balgley who has been 1st concertmaster of the Berliner Philharmoniker for four years.

Although the organ and the violin do not have much in common at first glance, both instruments are able in a particular way to make music sound almost like singing. This is shown by Ken Cowan and Noah Bendix-Balgley in Sergei Rachmaninov’s famous Vocalise and Sigfrid Karg-Elert’s intimate Pastorale.

Of course, our North-American guest also presents himself as a solo artist with compositions by Franz Liszt, Marcel Dupré and Camille Saint-Saëns. The matinee closes with Maurice Ravel’s famous rhapsody Tzigane, notorious for it technical difficulties, in an arrangement for violin and organ. Listen and be astounded.

(photo: Heribert Schindler)

Ken Cowan (photo: Lisa-Marie Mazzucco)