Bläser der Berliner Philharmoniker (photo: Peter Adamik)

Chamber Music

“Harmoniemusik” with the Winds of the Berliner Philharmoniker

In the time of the First Viennese School, the term “Harmoniemusik” was understood to mean catchy music which was pleasing to the ear and created a cheerful mood – musical entertainment in the best sense of the word! In this concert, the Winds of the Berliner Philharmoniker revive the old tradition of “Harmoniemusik”. With works by Franz Krommer, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Ludwig van Beethoven, they take their audience to Vienna which was then the main centre for this kind of music.

Bläser der Berliner Philharmoniker

Martin Heinze double bass

Franz Krommer

Partita for Wind Octet in C major, op. 76

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Serenade for Winds in E flar major, K. 375

Ludwig van Beethoven

Wind Octet in E flat major, op. 103

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Partita for Wind Octet in B (presumed Original Version of the Gran Partita Serenade, K, 361)

Dates and Tickets

sales information

Sun, 28 Jan 2018, 20:00

Chamber Music Hall | Introduction: 19:00

Serie Q

Programme

Austrian Emperor Joseph II was certainly not the only one – nearly every self-respecting noble family had a “Harmoniemusik” in the eighteenth century. By this is meant a wind ensemble which played for the entertainment of company. The term also refers to the music itself: catchy tunes that are pleasing to the ear and create a cheerful atmosphere. In this concert, the Winds of the Berliner Philharmoniker revive the old “Harmoniemusik” tradition. Their programme takes the audience to the musical metropolis of Vienna which was the capital of this kind of music at the time of Emperor Joseph II. In Vienna, Franz Vinzenz Krommer from Kamenice (near Jihlava in the Czech Republic) was one of the most successful composers of the genre. In his works, as his Partita for Wind Octet in C major shows, he succeeds in finding a balance between artistic aspiration and music which appeals to everyone.

The same is also true of the “Harmoniemusik” composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart who was just three years older. His Serenade for Winds in E-flat major is reminiscent of opera buffa in its musical gesture. The cantabile Adagio, for example, already anticipates the cavatine of the Countess in Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro. The Partita for Wind Octet in B is the presumptive original version of Mozart’s most famous “Harmoniemusik”: the Gran Partita K. 361. Ludwig van Beethoven’s Wind Octet in E flat Major op. 103 is – despite the high opus number – an early work. When the composer wrote it, he was still in the service of the Bonn Hofkapelle of Archduke Maximilian Francis of Austria. Like his brother the Austrian Emperor, the Elector was a great lover of Harmoniemusik and Beethoven’s first patron. He promoted the talented young composer to the best of his ability and arranged for his first stay in Vienna.

Bläser der Berliner Philharmoniker (photo: Peter Adamik)