Leif Ove Andses (photo: Chris Aadland)

Chamber Music

Piano recital with Leif Ove Andsnes

Leif Ove Andsnes’ playing can be described in a few short words: direct, gripping and crystal-clear. For 25 years, the Norwegian has been one of the pianists who regularly performs with the Berliner Philharmoniker, including as Pianist in Residence in the 2010/2011 season. The programme of this solo recital, which includes works by Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Sibelius and Widmann, gives Andsnes the opportunity to show the full range of his artistic abilities.

Leif Ove Andsnes piano

Jean Sibelius

The Birch op. 75 No. 4

Leif Ove Andsnes piano

Jean Sibelius

Impromptu, op. 97 No. 5

Leif Ove Andsnes piano

Jean Sibelius

Rondino II, op. 68 No. 2

Leif Ove Andsnes piano

Jean Sibelius

The Shepherd, op. 58 No. 4

Leif Ove Andsnes piano

Jean Sibelius

Romance, op. 24 No. 9

Leif Ove Andsnes piano

Jörg Widmann

Idyll and Abyss − Six Schubert Reminiscences for Piano

Leif Ove Andsnes piano

Franz Schubert

Drei Klavierstücke D 946

Leif Ove Andsnes piano

Ludwig van Beethoven

Piano Sonata No.17 in D minor, op. 31 No. 2 Tempest

Leif Ove Andsnes piano

Frédéric Chopin

Nocturne in B major, op. 62 No. 1

Leif Ove Andsnes piano

Frédéric Chopin

Ballade Nr. 4 f-Moll op. 52

Dates and Tickets

Fri, 01 Dec 2017, 20:00

Chamber Music Hall | Introduction: 19:00

Serie U

Programme

It is beyond question that the genre of piano ballade can be traced back to Frédéric Chopin. Whether a fellow countryman of the composer who had been living in exile since the early 1830s – the Polish poet Adam Mickiewicz – had an influence on the emergence of the piano ballade with his Ballads and Romances, published in 1822, has, however, not yet been proven. In any case, Mickiewicz was one of those friends of the composer who advised him “to undertake a great work, and not to fritter away his power on trifles”.

In Paris, Chopin composed four ballads which are modelled on the epic narrative expression of Polish legends and heroic songs. The last of them, op. 52, appears more complex than its three predecessors and combines elements of sonata, variation and rondo. The various musical facettes which exist between the Nocturne op. 62 No. 1 and the Ballade No. 4 by Chopin are revealed by Leif Ove Andsnes, a former pianist in residence with the Berliner Philharmoniker – and as part of an exceptionally exciting programme, includes music by Franz Schubert, without whose example Chopin’s compositional border crossing is hardly conceivable.

Andsnes proposes a connection with the present with his performance of a Schumann tribute from the pen of Jörg Widmann, born in 1973. The programme also includes piano pieces by Jean Sibelius, plus Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Sonata op. 32 No.2 – a work which is said to be inspired by William Shakespeare’s 1611 play The Tempest and which, among other things, can be heard as a three-movement piano ballade avant la lettre.

Leif Ove Andses (photo: Chris Aadland)