Goetz Teutsch (photo: Monika Rittershaus)

Chamber Music

The Philharmonic Salon

Chernivtsi – “an old Yiddish town”

Chernivtsi, the capital of Bukovina, was a multicultural metropolis where a predominantly Jewish population lived. This changed when, in the autumn of 1941, a large part of the Chernivtsi Jews were deported. In this Philharmonic Salon entitled “Czernowitz is gewen an alte, jidische Schtot”, Götz Teutsch traces the lives of Chernivtsi survivors who found a new home in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and Haifa at the end of a destructive century.

Udo Samel speaker

Noah Bendix-Balgley violin

Marlene Ito violin

Naoko Shimizu viola

Sennu Laine cello

Wenzel Fuchs clarinet

Alan Bern Akkordeon and piano

Cordelia Höfer piano

Götz Teutsch programme supervision

Czernowitz is gewen an alte, jidische Schtot...

Klezmer as well as Music by Max Bruch, Sergei Prokofiew, Dmitri Shostakovich, Ciprian Porumbescu, Joseph Achron, Alexander Krein and other composers

Texts by Paul Celan, Rose Ausländer, Nora Gray, Georg Drozdowski, Karl Emil Franzos, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Josef Burg, Zvi Yavetz and other authors

Dates and Tickets

Sun, 29 Oct 2017, 16:00

Chamber Music Hall | Introduction: 15:00

Serie S

Sun, 05 Nov 2017, 16:00

Chamber Music Hall | Introduction: 15:00

Serie S

Programme

Bukovina and its capital Czernowitz (Chernivtsi) was Crown land of the Habsburg Empire until 1918. After the First World War, the region fell to Romania. As a result of the Hitler-Stalin pact, the Red Army occupied Northern Bukovina in 1940, and in 1945, the area was divided between the Ukrainian Soviet Republic and Romania (which fought against the Soviet Union as an ally of the Germans until 1944). In Czernowitz, Jews, who made up about 30 percent of the population before the Second World War lived alongside Romanians, Germans, Ukrainians and Poles. The cultural diversity founded the myth of peaceful coexistence, although this was put to the test by an aggressive policy of Romanianisation in 1918.

This all changed radically in the autumn of 1941, when most of the Jews in Czernowitz were deported to camps across the border river Dniester. In this area, run by Romania and designated as “Transnistria”, a third of them died in extremely cruel conditions. Only about 20,000 Jews were allowed to remain in Czernowitz with a so-called ʻauthorisationʼ. However, their lives were severely affected by strict curfews, the requirement to wear the Star of David in addition to other sanctions. After the liberation by the Red Army in March 1944, the Jews who had survived the deportation were able to return to the now Soviet-occupied Czernowin. Most of them left Romania in the following years and emigrated to Israel.

In this Philharmonic Salon entitled “Czernowitz is gewen an alte, jidische Schtot” (Czernowitz was an old Yiddish town), Götz Teutsch traces the lives of Czernowitz survivors who found a new home in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and Haifa at the end of a destructive century. The pianist Cordelia Höfer and members of the Berliner Philharmoniker play klezmer music and works by Eusebius Mandyczewski, Joseph Achron, and George Enescu among others, and Udo Samel reads texts by Paul Celan, Rose Ausländer, Mihail Eminescu, Edith Silbermann and Gregor von Rezzori.

Goetz Teutsch (photo: Monika Rittershaus)