Organ

Organ matinee with Olivier Latry and Shin Young Lee

Does Igor Stravinsky’s ballet Le Sacre du printemps fit on organ? Definitely, says the French star organist Olivier Latry. The score’s elemental rhythmic force and orgiastic splendour of sound can be ideally shown on a large concert hall organ such as that in the Berliner Philharmonie. Before this, Olivier Latry will play the legendary Trois Préludes et Fugues by Marcel Dupré.

Olivier Latry Organ (Dupré, Stravinsky)

Shin Young Lee Organ (Stravinsky)

Four Hands, four hands Organ

Marcel Dupré

Trois Préludes et Fugues for organ op. 7

Igor Stravinsky

Le Sacre du printemps

Dates and Tickets

Sun, 28 May 2017, 11:00

Philharmonie – Karl Schuke Organ | Introduction: 10:00

Programme

Among organists, Marcel Dupré was an artist of superlatives. Over the course of his 85 years he played the most concerts, collected the highest fees and composed the most virtuoso works. Already at the age of 21, Dupré substituted for his teacher Charles-Marie Widor at the famous organ of Saint-Sulpice in Paris. That’s where Dupré composed his first organ works in 1912 – the legendary Trois Préludes et Fugues, considered unplayable by his contemporaries.

While Marcel Dupré prepared to conquer the organ world, Dupré’s contemporary Igor Stravinsky set off for pagan Russia – at least musically. “Wise old men sit in a circle and watch girls dance, one of them is going to be sacrificed to the God of Spring to appease him” (Igor Stravinsky). The premiere of the ballet music Le Sacre du printemps in Paris in May 1913 unleashed a veritable theatre scandal. But does this “massacre of spring”, as Claude Debussy once called the epoch-making work by his friend Stravinsky, fit on the organ at all? Definitely, says the French star organist Olivier Latry. The elemental rhythmic force and the score’s orgiastic splendour of sound can be ideally shown on a large concert hall organ such as that in the Berlin Philharmonie. Shin Young Lee will take a place next to Latry, and together they will play with four hands and four feet.

(photo: Hermann Willers)

(photo: privat)

(photo: Philippe Guyonnet)