Chamber Music

Jazz at Berlin Philharmonic with Åle Möller and Knut Reiersrud

The jazz trumpeter Åle Möller and the guitarist Knut Reiersrud have their love of Scandinavian folk music in common. As varied as the careers of these two artists may have developed – nowadays, they are among the leading musicians on the Nordic folk jazz scene. At the third concert in the series Jazz at Berlin Philharmonic, they form a “Celtic-Nordic connection”, proving once again the musical prowess with which they have created their very own musical cosmos.

Åle Möller Direction

Knut Reiersrud Guitar and Vocals

Celtic Roots

Curated by Siggi Loch

Dates and Tickets

Programme

There are many similarities between the careers of the Swede Åle Möller and the Norwegian Knut Reiersrud: both artists began as jazz musicians, Åle Möller as a trumpeter and Knut Reiersrud as a guitarist. Both learned additional instruments over time and discovered their love of folk music. Nowadays, Möller and Reiersrud are among the leading musicians on the Scandinavian folk jazz scene.

Åle Möller, who at an early age attempted to emulate his great role model, American jazz trumpeter Clifford Brown, began to become interested in the traditional music of Greece after an encounter with the Greek musician Christos Mitrencis. But that was not all. Inspired by Mediterranean rhythms and melodies, Möller set off to search for musical traces in his home country, and learned to play the flute and the shawm, as well as lute and accordion. His speciality is combining in his ensembles and bands instrumentalists from highly disparate musical traditions.

The same applies to the guitarist Knut Reiersrud, who raved about Miles Davis and Michał Urbaniak in his youth and as an 18-year old so impressed blues guitarist Buddy Guy that the latter invited him to Chicago. Reiersrud, who has worked together with greats like Joe Cocker, Stevie Ray Vaughan and David Lindley, has mastered the most varied of styles. Linking jazz with the musical roots of his Nordic home is an important focus for him, as it is for Åle Möller.

(c) Promo