Chamber Music

Philharmonic debut: Pavel Haas Quartet

There are many young world-famous string quartets. But among them the Pavel Haas Quartet, which continues the great Czech string quartet tradition, stands out with intense, vivid and sensual playing. At their debut at the Berliner Philharmoniker concerts, the Pavel Haas Quartet will present Beethoven’s Opus 95, as well as Dmitri Shostakovich’s Eighth and Béla Bartók’s Fifth String Quartet.

Pavel Haas Quartet:

Veronika Jarůšková Violin

Marek Zwiebel Violin

Pavel Nikl Viola

Peter Jarůšek Cello

Ludwig van Beethoven

String Quartet No. 11 in F minor

Dmitri Shostakovich

String Quartet No. 8 in C minor

Béla Bartók

String Quartet No. 5

Dates and Tickets

Programme

There are many young world-famous string quartets. But the Pavel Haas Quartet, which continues the great Czech string quartet tradition, stands out with intense, vivid and sensual playing. The ensemble, domiciled in Prague, studied with leading personalities in the string quartet world, including with Milan Škampa, legendary violist of the Smetana Quartet, as well as with Walter Levin, first violinist of the LaSalle Quartet for many years.

At their debut at the Berlin Philharmonic concerts, the Pavel Haas Quartet will present Beethoven’s String Quartet in F minor op. 95, titled “Quartetto serioso” in the manuscript – the full gravity of this music becomes obvious already with the driving main theme of the first movement. With Shostakovich’s String Quartet No. 8 there follows a work of confessional personal character, as all five movements of this music – which at times takes on a desperate character – are infused with his monogram D-eS-c-h [d/e-flat/c/b]; according to Isaak Glikman, directly before composing the quartet Shostakovich had to read out his application to become a member of the Communist Party at a party meeting “like a parrot” under the forced influence of alcohol …

Finally, they will play Béla Bartók’s Fifth String Quartet: the rhythmic energetic Allegro is followed by a shadowy Adagio, a lively Scherzo and a fanciful passionate Andante. It concludes with an unleashed Finale that speeds along, thematically related to the first movement.

(c) Marco Borggreve