Berliner Philharmoniker

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Berliner Philharmoniker

Andris Nelsons conducts Mahler’s Fifth Symphony

When you think of Mahler’s Fifth Symphony, you think of the Adagietto – at least since the movement made an essential contribution to the morbid charm of Luchino Visconti’s “Death in Venice”, the Thomas Mann adaptation released in 1971. Besides Mahler’s world-famous music, conductor Andris Nelsons will offer an exciting discovery: HK Gruber’s trumpet concerto “Aerial”, which oscillates between yearning jazz and ironic dance music. The soloist is Håkan Hardenberger.

Berliner Philharmoniker

Andris Nelsons Conductor

Håkan Hardenberger Trumpet

HK Gruber

Aerial, Concerto for trumpet and orchestra

Håkan Hardenberger Trumpet

Gustav Mahler

Symphony No. 5

Dates and Tickets Introduction one hour before the concert begins.

Thu, 23 Apr 2015 8 p.m.

Philharmonie

25 to 74 €

Fri, 24 Apr 2015 8 p.m.

Philharmonie

25 to 74 €

Sat, 25 Apr 2015 7 p.m.

Philharmonie

25 to 74 €

Programme

HK Gruber writes about his trumpet concerto Aerial, premiered in 1999 in London: “The concerto offers two aerial views, firstly an imaginary landscape beneath the Northern Lights bearing an inscription from Emily Dickinson’s poem Wild Nights: ‘Done with the compass – Done with the chart!’ In part this refers to the pure invention that can be conjured up through the skills of a great trumpeter. [...] The second and larger of the two aerial views, entitled Gone Dancing, has a view as if from another planet – our world is empty of human life, but a lone sign bears the words ‘Gone Dancing’.” This subtle and virtuoso composition can be experienced in the Philharmonie with the interpreter of the premiere, Håkan Hardenberger – veritably a “great trumpeter”.

Andris Nelsons – a welcome guest of the orchestra on the conductor’s podium of the Berliner Philharmoniker since his highly acclaimed debut in 2010 – will place Gustav Mahler’s Fifth Symphony on the second half of the concert. Mahler complained that the composition, first performed in 1904 in Cologne, was a “cursed work” that “no one understands”. Today, the Fifth Symphony is among the most frequently played works by Mahler; we can be doubly excited to experience the Latvian conductor’s interpretation.

Andris Nelsons
Håkan Hardenberger

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